skip to main content

SciTech ConnectSciTech Connect

Title: RED NOISE VERSUS PLANETARY INTERPRETATIONS IN THE MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2013-BLG-446

For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A{sub max} ∼ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (∼3M{sub ⨁}) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ;  [4] ; ;  [5] ;  [6] ; ; ; ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] more »; ; ; ; ; ; « less
  1. Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar)
  2. Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)
  3. School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)
  4. Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)
  5. Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)
  6. Dipartimento di Fisica “E.R. Caianiello,” Università di Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo, I-84084-Fisciano (Italy)
  7. SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)
  8. European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)
  9. Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Gttingen (Germany)
  10. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)
  11. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020 (New Zealand)
  12. UPMC-CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)
  13. Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22518766
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 812; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DETECTION; DIAGRAMS; EARTH PLANET; ERRORS; GLOBAL ASPECTS; GRAVITATIONAL LENSES; MASS; NOISE; RELIABILITY; STARS; VISIBLE RADIATION