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Title: Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation ofmore » the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of one particle then consists of two components, the incident sound wave and the scattered field generated by the neighboring particle. The radiation force calculation then includes the contributions of these two fields and incorporates the mutual particle influence. In this investigation the droplet/particle influence on each other has been analyzed theoretically by using the method developed by Gorkov and modified by Ilinskii et al.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ;  [2]
  1. Mechanical Engineering, Western New England University, Springfield, Massachusetts, 01119 (United States)
  2. Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78713–8029 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22492631
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1685; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 20. international symposium on nonlinear acoustics, Ecully (France), 29 Jun - 3 Jul 2015, 2. international sonic boom forum, Ecully (France), 29 Jun - 3 Jul 2015; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 42 ENGINEERING; BLOOD; CONCENTRATION RATIO; DIPOLES; DROPLETS; EMULSIONS; LAMINAR FLOW; LIPIDS; MEMS; OILS; PARTICLE INTERACTIONS; PARTICLE SIZE; SCATTERING; SOUND WAVES; STANDING WAVES; WATER; WAVELENGTHS