skip to main content

SciTech ConnectSciTech Connect

Title: Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, “native-roughness” modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15%–20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3–4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations.more » In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have prompted looking for ways to reduce UV light exposure during target fabrication.« less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1] ; ;  [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF Directorate, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)
  2. General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22490013
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ACCURACY; CAPSULES; FOILS; HYDRODYNAMICS; IMPLOSIONS; MEMBRANES; MODULATION; OXYGEN; PLASMA INSTABILITY; PLASTICS; ROUGHNESS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SPHERICAL CONFIGURATION; SURFACES; TARGETS; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; TIME RESOLUTION; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; US NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY; X RADIATION