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Title: Phase separation and crystallization process of amorphous Fe{sub 78}B{sub 12}Si{sub 9}Ni{sub 1} alloy

The influence of the melt heat treatment on the structure and crystallization process of the rapidly quenched amorphous Fe{sub 78}B{sub 12}Si{sub 9}Ni{sub 1} alloys have been investigated by means of x-ray diffraction, DSC and TEM. Amorphous phase separation has been observed in the alloys quenched after the preliminary high temperature heat treatment of the liquid alloy (heating above 1400°C). Comparative analysis of the pair distribution functions demonstrates that this phase separation accompanied by a changes in the local atomic arrangement. It has been found that crystallization process at heating is strongly dependent on the initial amorphous phase structure - homogeneous or phase separated. In the last case crystallization goes through the formation of a new metastable hexagonal phase [a=12.2849(9) Ǻ, c=7.6657(8) Ǻ]. At the same time the activation energy for crystallization (Ea) reduces from 555 to 475 kJ mole{sup −1}.
Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Structural-Phase Transformations, Physical Technical Institute, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirov street 132, Izhevsk (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22488753
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1673; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: LAM-15: 15. international conference on liquid and amorphous metals, Beijing (China), 15-20 Sep 2013; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ACTIVATION ENERGY; AMORPHOUS STATE; BORON ALLOYS; CALORIMETRY; CRYSTALLIZATION; DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS; HEAT TREATMENTS; HEATING; HEXAGONAL LATTICES; IRON BASE ALLOYS; LIQUIDS; NICKEL ALLOYS; SILICON ALLOYS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION