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Title: CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions from China’s beef feedlots with ad libitum and restricted feeding in fall and spring seasons

Accurately quantifying methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from beef operations in China is necessary to evaluate the contribution of beef cattle to greenhouse gas budgets at the national and global level. Methane and N{sub 2}O emissions from two intensive beef feedlots in the North China Plain, one with a restricted feeding strategy and high manure collection frequency and the other with an ad libitum feeding strategy and low manure collection frequency, were quantified in the fall and spring seasons using an inverse dispersion technique. The diel pattern of CH{sub 4} from the beef feedlot with an ad libitum feed strategy (single peak during a day) differed from that under a restricted feeding condition (multiple peaks during a day), but little difference in the diel pattern of N{sub 2}O emissions between two feeding strategies was observed. The two-season average CH{sub 4} emission rates of the two intensive feedlots were 230 and 198 g CH{sub 4} animal{sup −1} d{sup −1} and accounted for 6.7% and 6.8% of the gross energy intake, respectively, indicating little impact of the feeding strategy and manure collection frequency on the CH{sub 4} conversion factor at the feedlot level. However, the average N{sub 2}Omore » emission rates (21.2 g N{sub 2}O animal{sup −1} d{sup −1}) and conversion factor (8.5%) of the feedlot with low manure collection frequency were approximately 131% and 174% greater, respectively, than the feedlot under high frequency conditions, which had a N{sub 2}O emission rate and conversion factor of 9.2 g N{sub 2}O animal{sup −1} d{sup −1} and 3.1%, respectively, indicating that increasing manure collection frequency played an important role in reducing N{sub 2}O emissions from beef feedlots. In addition, comparison indicated that China’s beef and dairy cattle in feedlots appeared to have similar CH{sub 4} conversion factors. - Highlights: • CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions from China’s beef feedlots were provided in the first time. • Feeding strategies determined the diurnal pattern of feedlot CH{sub 4} emission. • Frequency of manure collection played an important role in N{sub 2}O from feedlots.« less
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [1] ; ;  [1] ; ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural University of Hebei, 071000 Baoding (China)
  2. College of Animal Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Hebei, 071000 Baoding (China)
  3. Mechanical and Electric Engineering College, Agricultural University of Hebei, 071000 Baoding (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22483292
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Research; Journal Volume: 138; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; APPROXIMATIONS; AUGMENTATION; BUDGETS; CATTLE; CHINA; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CONVERSION; DISPERSIONS; EMISSION; FEEDING; GREENHOUSE GASES; INTAKE; MANURES; MEAT; METHANE; NITROUS OXIDE; PEAKS; SEASONS; SPRINGS