skip to main content

Title: Temperature quenching of spontaneous emission in tunnel-injection nanostructures

The spontaneous-emission spectra in the near-IR range (0.8–1.3 μm) from inverted tunnel-injection nanostructures are measured. These structures contain an InAs quantum-dot layer and an InGaAs quantum-well layer, separated by GaAs barrier spacer whose thickness varies in the range 3–9 nm. The temperature dependence of this emission in the range 5–295 K is investigated, both for optical excitation (photoluminescence) and for current injection in p–n junction (electroluminescence). At room temperature, current pumping proves more effective for inverted tunnel-injection nanostructures with a thin barrier (<6 nm), when the apexes of the quantum dots connect with the quantum well by narrow InGaAs straps (nanobridges). In that case, the quenching of the electroluminescence by heating from 5 to 295 K is slight. The quenching factor S{sub T} of the integrated intensity I is S{sub T} = I{sub 5}/I{sub 295} ≈ 3. The temperature stability of the emission from inverted tunnel-injection nanostructures is discussed on the basis of extended Arrhenius analysis.
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. St. Petersburg State University, Fock Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)
  2. Russian Academy of Sciences, Academic University, Nanotechnology Center (Russian Federation)
  3. Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, ICMS (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22469692
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semiconductors; Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; DIFFUSION BARRIERS; ELECTROLUMINESCENCE; EMISSION SPECTRA; EXCITATION; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; HEATING; INDIUM ARSENIDES; IODINE; LAYERS; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; QUANTUM DOTS; QUANTUM WELLS; QUENCHING; SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTIONS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE