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Title: Nonclinical evaluation of the potential for mast cell activation by an erythropoietin analog

The erythropoietin analog peginesatide was withdrawn from marketing due to unexpected severe anaphylactic reactions associated with administration of the multi-use formulation. The adverse events occurred rapidly following the first ever administration of the drug with most affected patients becoming symptomatic in less than 30 min. This is most consistent with an anaphylactoid reaction due to direct activation of mast cells. Laboratory evaluation was undertaken using rat peritoneal mast cells as the model system. Initial studies showed that high concentrations of the formulated drug as well as formulated vehicle alone could cause mast cell degranulation as measured by histamine release. The purified active drug was not able to cause histamine release whereas the vehicle filtrate and lab created drug vehicle were equally potent at causing histamine release. Individual formulations of vehicle leaving one component out showed that histamine release was due to phenol. Dose response studies with phenol showed a very sharp dose response curve that was similar in three buffer systems. Cellular analysis by flow cytometry showed that the histamine release was not due to cell death, and that changes in light scatter parameters consistent with degranulation were rapidly observed. Limited testing with primary human mast cells showed a similarmore » dose response of histamine release with exposure to phenol. To provide in vivo confirmation, rats were injected with vehicle formulated with various concentrations of phenol via a jugular vein cannula. Significant release of histamine was detected in blood samples taken 2 min after dosing at the highest concentrations tested. - Highlights: • Peginesatide caused severe anaphylactoid reactions in 0.2% of patients. • Both formulated drug and vehicle cause degranulation of rat mast cells. • Phenol was identified as the vehicle component causing degranulation. • Human mast cells show similar dose response to phenol as rat mast cells. • Histamine release could be caused in vivo in rats by rapid phenol injection.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States)
  2. Division of Pharmaceutical Analysis, OTR/OPQ/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22465825
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 287; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; APOPTOSIS; BLOOD; CONCENTRATION RATIO; DOSES; DRUGS; ERYTHROPOIETIN; EVALUATION; HISTAMINE; IN VIVO; INJECTION; MARKETING; MAST CELLS; PATIENTS; PHENOL; RATS; TESTING; VEINS