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Title: Arsenic methylation capacity is associated with breast cancer in northern Mexico

Exposure to environmental contaminants, dietary factors and lifestyles may explain worldwide different breast cancer (BC) incidence. Inorganic arsenic (iAs) in the drinking water is a concern in many regions, such as northern Mexico. Studies in several countries have associated the proportion of urinary monomethylarsenic (%MMA) with increased risks for many As-related diseases, including cancer. To investigate the potential relationships between the risk of BC and the capacity to methylate iAs, a hospital-based case–control study (1016 cases/1028 controls) was performed in northern Mexico. Women were directly interviewed about their reproductive histories. The profile of As metabolites in urine was determined by HPLC-ICP-MS and methylation capacity was assessed by metabolite percentages and indexes. Total urinary As, excluding arsenobetaine (TAs-AsB), ranged from 0.26 to 303.29 μg/L. Most women (86%) had TAs-AsB levels below As biological exposure index (35 μg/L). Women with higher %MMA and/or primary methylation index (PMI) had an increased BC risk (%MMA OR{sub Q5vs.Q1} = 2.63; 95%CI 1.89,3.66; p for trend < 0.001; PMI OR{sub Q5vs.Q1} = 1.90; 95%CI 1.39,2.59, p for trend < 0.001). In contrast, women with higher proportion of urinary dimethylarsenic (%DMA) and/or secondary methylation index (SMI) had a reduced BC risk (%DMA OR{sub Q5vs.Q1} = 0.63; 95%CImore » 0.45,0.87, p for trend 0.006; SMI OR{sub Q5vsQ1} = 0.42, 95%CI 0.31,0.59, p for trend < 0.001). Neither %iAs nor total methylation index was associated to BC risk. Inter-individual variations in iAs metabolism may play a role in BC carcinogenesis. Women with higher capacity to methylate iAs to MMA and/or a lower capacity to further methylate MMA to DMA were at higher BC risk. - Highlights: • Arsenic methylation capacity is associated to an increased breast cancer (BC) risk. • Women with higher capacity to methylate arsenic to MMA were at higher BC risk. • Women with higher capacity to methylate arsenic to DMA were at lower BC risk. • Associations occurred at urinary As levels near the biological exposure index.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [4]
  1. Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico)
  2. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  3. Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica del Hospital de Especialidades No. 2, Unidad Médica de Alta Especialidad, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Ciudad Obregón, Sonora, México (Mexico)
  4. Departamento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, México City, México (Mexico)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22439851
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 280; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARSENIC; CAPACITY; CARCINOGENESIS; DNA DAMAGES; DRINKING WATER; HAZARDS; HOSPITALS; MAMMARY GLANDS; METABOLISM; METABOLITES; METHYLATION; MEXICO; NEOPLASMS; URINE; WOMEN