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Title: Association between arsenic exposure from drinking water and hematuria: Results from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study

Arsenic (As) exposure has been associated with both urologic malignancy and renal dysfunction; however, its association with hematuria is unknown. We evaluated the association between drinking water As exposure and hematuria in 7843 men enrolled in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS). Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data was conducted with As exposure assessed in both well water and urinary As measurements, while hematuria was measured using urine dipstick. Prospective analyses with Cox proportional regression models were based on urinary As and dipstick measurements obtained biannually since baseline up to six years. At baseline, urinary As was significantly related to prevalence of hematuria (P-trend < 0.01), with increasing quintiles of exposure corresponding with respective prevalence odds ratios of 1.00 (reference), 1.29 (95% CI: 1.04–1.59), 1.41 (95% CI: 1.15–1.74), 1.46 (95% CI: 1.19–1.79), and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.27–1.91). Compared to those with relatively little absolute urinary As change during follow-up (− 10.40 to 41.17 μg/l), hazard ratios for hematuria were 0.99 (95% CI: 0.80–1.22) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65–0.99) for those whose urinary As decreased by > 47.49 μg/l and 10.87 to 47.49 μg/l since last visit, respectively, and 1.17 (95% CI: 0.94–1.45) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.10–1.66) for thosemore » with between-visit increases of 10.40 to 41.17 μg/l and > 41.17 μg/l, respectively. These data indicate a positive association of As exposure with both prevalence and incidence of dipstick hematuria. This exposure effect appears modifiable by relatively short-term changes in drinking water As. - Highlights: • Hematuria is the most common symptom of urinary tract disease. • Arsenic exposure is associated with renal dysfunction and urologic malignancy. • Water arsenic was positively associated with prevalence and incidence of hematuria. • Reduction in exposure lowered hematuria risk especially in low-to-moderate exposed. • Arsenic-related hematuria may represent nonmalignant or premalignant condition.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [2] ; ; ; ; ;  [5] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [3] more »; « less
  1. Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)
  4. Department of Urology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)
  5. U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22439686
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 276; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARSENIC; BANGLADESH; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DRINKING WATER; EPIDEMIOLOGY; HAZARDS; KIDNEYS; MEN; NEOPLASMS; SYMPTOMS; URINARY TRACT; URINE