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Title: Temperature and acidity effects on WO{sub 3} nanostructures and gas-sensing properties of WO{sub 3} nanoplates

Graphical abstract: Generally, large acid quantity and high temperature are beneficial to the formation of anhydrous WO3, but the acidity effect on the crystal phase is weaker than that of temperature. Large acid quantity is found helpful to the oriented growth of tungsten oxides, forming a nanoplate-like product. - Highlights: • Large acid quantity is propitious to the oriented growth of a WO{sub 3} nanoplate. • Effect of acid quantity on crystal phases of products is weaker than that of temperature. • One step hydrothermal synthesis of WO{sub 3} is facile and can be easily scaled up. • A WO{sub 3} nanoplate shows a fast response and distinct sensing selectivity to acetone gas. - Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method using Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O and HNO{sub 3} as raw materials. They are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The specific surface area was obtained from N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm. The effects of the amount of HNO{sub 3}, hydrothermal temperature and reaction time on the crystal phases and morphologies of the WO{sub 3} nanostructures were investigated in detail, and the reaction mechanism was discussed. Large amountmore » of acid is found for the first time to be helpful to the oriented growth of tungsten oxides, forming nanoplate-like products, while hydrothermal temperature has more influence on the crystal phase of the product. Gas-sensing properties of the series of as-prepared WO{sub 3} nanoplates were tested by means of acetone, ethanol, formaldehyde and ammonia. One of the WO{sub 3} nanoplates with high specific surface area and high crystallinity displays high sensitivity, fast response and distinct sensing selectivity to acetone gas.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ; ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [2]
  1. School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)
  2. Department of Materials Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), TKL of Metal and Molecule-based Material Chemistry, Synergetic Innovation Centre of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22420564
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Research Bulletin; Journal Volume: 57; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ADSORPTION; AMMONIA; CRYSTALS; DESORPTION; ETHANOL; FORMALDEHYDE; HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS; NANOSTRUCTURES; NITRIC ACID; RAW MATERIALS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SODIUM TUNGSTATES; SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TUNGSTEN OXIDES; X-RAY DIFFRACTION