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Title: Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villusmore » and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ; ; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo Japan (Japan)
  2. Division of Gastroenterology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo Japan (Japan)
  3. Research Center Hospital, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)
  4. Radiation Oncology Center, Dokkyo Medical University, Tochigi (Japan)
  5. Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo (Japan)
  6. Division of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo Japan (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22420511
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ABDOMEN; ANIMAL TISSUES; BLOOD; BRAGG CURVE; CARBON IONS; INFLAMMATION; INTESTINES; ION BEAMS; KIDNEYS; LIVER; MEV RANGE 100-1000; MICE; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY; THICKNESS; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; WEIGHT