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Title: Outcomes of Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Metastases

Purpose/Objective(s): Radiation therapy can be used to treat uveal metastases with the goal of local control and improvement of quality of life. Proton therapy can be used to treat uveal tumors efficiently and with expectant minimization of normal tissue injury. Here, we report the use of proton beam therapy for the management of uveal metastases. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was made of all patients with uveal metastases treated at our institution with proton therapy between June 2002 and June 2012. Patient and tumor characteristics, fractionation and dose schemes, local control, and toxicities are reported. Results: Ninety patients were identified. Of those, 13 were excluded because of missing information. We report on 77 patients with 99 affected eyes with available data. Patients were 68% female, and the most common primary tumor was breast carcinoma (49%). The median age at diagnosis of uveal metastasis was 57.9 years. Serous retinal detachment was seen in 38% of treated eyes. The median follow-up time was 7.7 months. The median dose delivered to either eye was 20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) in 2 fractions. Local control was 94%. The median survival after diagnosis of uveal metastases was 12.3 months (95% confidence interval, 7.7-16.8). Death in all casesmore » was secondary to systemic disease. Radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was observed in 50% of evaluable treated eyes. The actuarial rate of radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was 46% at 6 months and 73% at 1 year. The 6 eyes with documented local failure were successfully salvaged with retreatment. Conclusions: Proton therapy is an effective and efficient means of treating uveal metastases. Acutely, the majority of patients experience minor adverse effects. For longer-term survivors, the risk of retinal injury with vision loss increases significantly over the first year.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [2]
  1. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
  3. Retina Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
  4. Division of Biostatistics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22420495
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; DEATH; DIAGNOSIS; EYES; HAZARDS; INJURIES; MAMMARY GLANDS; METASTASES; PATIENTS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RBE; REVIEWS; STANDARD OF LIVING; TOXICITY; VISION