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Title: Single and double resonance spectroscopy of methanol embedded in superfluid helium nanodroplets

Methanol is one of the simplest molecules that undergo torsional oscillations, and so it has been extensively studied in the gas phase by various spectroscopic techniques. At 300 K, a large number of rotational, torsional, and vibrational energy levels is populated, and this makes for a rather complicated spectrum, which is still not fully understood. It is expected that in going from 300 K to 0.4 K (the temperature of helium nanodroplets) the population distribution of methanol will mainly collapse into two states; the J{sub K} = 0{sub 0} state for the A{sub 1} nuclear spin symmetry species (with I{sub CH{sub 3}} = 3/2), and the J{sub K} = 1{sub −1} state for the E species (I{sub CH{sub 3}} = 1/2). This results in a simplified spectrum that consists of narrow a-type (ΔK = 0) lines and broader b- and c-type (ΔK = ±1) lines. We have recorded the rotovibrational spectrum of CH{sub 3}OH in the OH stretching, CH{sub 3} stretching and bending, CH{sub 3} rocking, and CO stretching regions, and have firmly assigned five bands (v{sub 1}, v{sub 2}, v{sub 3}, v{sub 7}, and v{sub 8}), and tentatively assigned five others (v{sub 9}, 2v{sub 4}, v{sub 4} + v{submore » 10}, 2v{sub 10}, and v{sub 4} + v{sub 5}). To our knowledge, the transitions we have assigned within the v{sub 4} + v{sub 10}, 2v{sub 10}, and v{sub 4} + v{sub 5} bands have not yet been assigned in the gas phase, and we hope that considering the very small “matrix” shift in helium nanodroplets (<1 cm{sup −1} for most subband origins of CH{sub 3}OH), those made here can aid in their gas phase identification. Microwave-infrared double resonance spectroscopy was used to confirm the initially tentative a-type infrared assignments in the OH stretching (v{sub 1}) band of A{sub 1} species methanol, in addition to revealing “warm” b-type lines. From a rotovibrational analysis, the B rotational constant is found to be reduced quite significantly (56%) with respect to the gas phase, and the torsional tunneling splittings are relatively unaffected and are at most reduced by 16%. While most rovibrational peaks are Lorentzian shaped, and those which are significantly perturbed by vibrational coupling in the gas phase are additionally broadened, the narrowest ΔJ = +1 peaks are asymmetric, and a skew-type analysis suggests that the response time of the helium solvent upon excitation is of the order of 1 ns.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Department of Chemistry, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)
  2. Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)
  3. Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22419931
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 141; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CARBON MONOXIDE; ENERGY LEVELS; EXCITATION; HELIUM; MATRICES; METHANOL; MOLECULES; PEAKS; RESONANCE; SOLVENTS; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; SPIN; TUNNEL EFFECT