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Title: Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach themore » correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by identifying the structural feature responsible for the entropy change, and point to a possible explanation for the observed dependence on length scale. Our key results are that the hydrophobic effect, i.e. the signature, temperature-dependent, solvation entropy of nonpolar molecules in water, is largely due to a dispersion force arising from correlations between rotating permanent dipole moments, that the strength of this force depends on the Kirkwood g-factor, and that the strength of this force may be obtained exactly without simulation.« less
Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22415529
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 142; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2015 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; BENCHMARKS; CHEMICAL BONDS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CORRELATIONS; DIPOLE MOMENTS; DISPERSIONS; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ENTROPY; FLUCTUATIONS; FREE ENERGY; HYDROGEN; LANDE FACTOR; MOLECULES; PARTICLES; SOLUTES; SOLVATION; SOLVENTS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; WATER