skip to main content

SciTech ConnectSciTech Connect

Title: Study on the dynamics responses of a transmission system made from carbon nanotubes

A rotational transmission system from coaxial carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated using a computational molecular dynamics approach. The system consists of a motor from a single-walled carbon nanotube and a bearing from a double-walled carbon nanotube. The motor has a high fixed rotational frequency and the two ends of the outer tube in the bearing are fixed. The inner tube in the bearing works as a rotor. Because of the interlayer friction in the bearing, configurations of the joint between the adjacent ends of motor and rotor have significant effects on rotational transmission properties. Four factors are considered in simulation, i.e., the bonding types of atoms (sp{sup 1} and sp{sup 2}) on the ends of motor and rotor, the difference between motor and rotor radii, the rotational speed of motor, and the environmental temperature. It is found that the synchronous transmission happens if the sp{sup 1} atoms on the jointed ends of motor and rotor are bonded each other and become new sp{sup 2} atoms. Therefore, the lower difference between radii of motor and rotor, higher temperature of environment leads to synchronous rotational transmission easily. If the environmental temperature is too low (e.g., <150‚ÄČK), the end of motor adjacent tomore » rotor is easily under buckling and new sp{sup 2} atoms appear, too. With capped CNTs or higher radii difference between rotor and motor at an appropriate temperature, a stable asynchronous rotation of rotor can be generated, and the rotor's frequency varying linearly with motor's frequency between 230 and 270 GHz. A multi-signal transmission device combined with oscillating and rotational motion is proposed for motor and stator shares a same size in radius.« less
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100 (China)
  2. Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601 (Australia)
  3. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211-2200 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22412946
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 117; Journal Issue: 23; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; AMBIENT TEMPERATURE; BUCKLING; CARBON NANOTUBES; FRICTION; GHZ RANGE; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; MOTORS; ROTATION; STATORS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; VELOCITY