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Title: WE-E-18A-04: Precision In-Vivo Dosimetry Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeters and a Pulsed-Stimulating Dose Reader

Purpose: A new readout technology based on pulsed optically stimulating luminescence is introduced (microSTARii, Landauer, Inc, Glenwood, IL60425). This investigation searches for approaches that maximizes the dosimetry accuracy in clinical applications. Methods: The sensitivity of each optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) was initially characterized by exposing it to a given radiation beam. After readout, the luminescence signal stored in the OSLD was erased by exposing its sensing area to a 21W white LED light for 24 hours. A set of OSLDs with consistent sensitivities was selected to calibrate the dose reader. Higher order nonlinear curves were also derived from the calibration readings. OSLDs with cumulative doses below 15 Gy were reused. Before an in-vivo dosimetry, the OSLD luminescence signal was erased with the white LED light. Results: For a set of 68 manufacturer-screened OSLDs, the measured sensitivities vary in a range of 17.3%. A sub-set of the OSLDs with sensitivities within ±1% was selected for the reader calibration. Three OSLDs in a group were exposed to a given radiation. Nine groups were exposed to radiation doses ranging from 0 to 13 Gy. Additional verifications demonstrated that the reader uncertainty is about 3%. With an external calibration function derived by fittingmore » the OSLD readings to a 3rd-order polynomial, the dosimetry uncertainty dropped to 0.5%. The dose-luminescence response curves of individual OSLDs were characterized. All curves converge within 1% after the sensitivity correction. With all uncertainties considered, the systematic uncertainty is about 2%. Additional tests emulating in-vivo dosimetry by exposing the OSLDs under different radiation sources confirmed the claim. Conclusion: The sensitivity of individual OSLD should be characterized initially. A 3rd-order polynomial function is a more accurate representation of the dose-luminescence response curve. The dosimetry uncertainty specified by the manufacturer is 4%. Following the proposed approach, it can be controlled to 2%.« less
Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Hickman Cancer Center, ProMedica Flower Hospital, Sylvania, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22409723
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACCURACY; CALIBRATION; DOSEMETERS; DOSIMETRY; IN VIVO; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION SOURCES; READOUT SYSTEMS; SENSITIVITY