skip to main content

Title: Detrapping of tungsten nanoparticles in a direct-current argon glow discharge

Nanoparticles are grown from the sputtering of a tungsten cathode in a direct current argon glow discharge. Laser light scattering of a vertical laser sheet going through the plasma reveals that the dust particle cloud is compressed and pushed towards the anode during the discharge. Scanning electron microscopy images of substrates exposed to the plasma for given durations show that dust particles are continuously falling down on the anode during the discharge. These observations are explained by the fact that the electrostatic force at the negative glow-anode sheath boundary cannot balance the ion drag, gravity, and thermophoresis forces for particles of more than a few tens of nanometres in diameter.
Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 13397 Marseille (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22407961
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ANODES; ARGON; CATHODES; DIRECT CURRENT; DRAG; DUSTS; GLOW DISCHARGES; GRAVITATION; LASERS; LIGHT SCATTERING; NANOPARTICLES; PLASMA; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SPUTTERING; SUBSTRATES; THERMOPHORESIS; TUNGSTEN