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Title: Evolution of helical perturbations in a thin-shell model of an imploding liner

A thin-shell model of the liner stability has been revisited and applied to the stability of the helical perturbations. Several stages of the implosion have been identified, starting from a long initial “latent” phase of an almost resting liner, continuing to the second stage of a rapid contraction and significant perturbation growth, and then transitioning to the third stage where perturbations become ballistic and highly non-linear. The stage of stagnation and rebound is beyond the scope of this paper. An importance of vorticity conservation during the late stages is emphasized. Nonlinear evolution of perturbations is followed up to the point of the formation of cusp structures. Effects of in-surface flows and of their enhancement due to the vorticity conservation are discussed. It is shown that the pre-machined perturbations created only on the outer surface of the liner grow much slower than one could anticipate. The limitations on the thin-shell description are discussed.
Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22403276
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; DISTURBANCES; EVOLUTION; LINERS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; PERTURBATION THEORY; STABILITY