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Title: Evidence of sublaminar drag naturally occurring in a curved pipe

Steady and unsteady flows in a mildly curved pipe for a wide range of Reynolds numbers are examined with direct numerical simulation. It is shown that in a range of Reynolds numbers in the vicinity of Re{sub b} ≈ 3400, based on bulk velocity and pipe diameter, a marginally turbulent flow is established in which the friction drag naturally reduces below the laminar solution at the same Reynolds number. The obtained values for friction drag for the laminar and turbulent (sublaminar) flows turn out to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements in the literature. Our results are also in agreement with Fukagata et al. [“On the lower bound of net driving power in controlled duct flows,” Phys. D 238, 1082 (2009)], as the lower bound of net power required to drive the flow, i.e., the pressure drop of the Stokes solution, is still lower than our marginally turbulent flow. A large-scale traveling structure that is thought to be responsible for that behaviour is identified in the instantaneous field. This mode could also be extracted using proper orthogonal decomposition. The effect of this mode is to redistribute the mean flow in the circular cross section which leads to lower gradientsmore » at the wall compared to the laminar flow.« less
Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Swedish e-Science Research Centre (SeRC) and Linné FLOW Centre, KTH Mechanics, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22403217
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Fluids (1994); Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DRAG; DUCTS; FRICTION; LAMINAR FLOW; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; PIPES; PRESSURE DROP; REYNOLDS NUMBER; TURBULENT FLOW; UNSTEADY FLOW; VELOCITY