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Title: Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [5] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [3] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)
  2. (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China)
  3. Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China)
  4. (China)
  5. (HPSynC), Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)
  6. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22398956
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; COMPRESSIBILITY; COMPRESSION; CRYSTALS; DIAMONDS; ENERGY DENSITY; GERMANIUM; HARDENING; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PLASTICITY; PRESSURE RANGE GIGA PA; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; STRAINS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; TIN; X-RAY DIFFRACTION