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Title: Cosmology and astrophysics with galaxy clusters

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe, whose formation is driven by dark energy and dark matter. The majority of the baryonic mass in clusters resides in the hot X-ray emitting plasma, which also leaves imprints in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Recent X-ray and microwave observations have revealed detailed thermodynamic structure of the hot X-ray emitting plasma from their cores to the virial radii, making comparisons of baryonic component in simulations to observations a strong cosmological probe. However, the statistical power of these future surveys can only be exploited for cosmology if and only if we are able to measure the cluster mass with a very high precision. I will discuss recent progress and future challenges for the use of galaxy clusters as precise cosmological probes, with highlights on (1) the importance of understanding thermodynamics and plasma physics in the outskirts of galaxy clusters and (2) prospects for improving the power of cluster-based cosmological measurements using numerical simulations and multi-wavelength observations.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22390658
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1632; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 18. Graduate School in Astronomy, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), 21-25 Oct 2013; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; ASTROPHYSICS; BARYONS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COSMOLOGY; GALAXY CLUSTERS; MASS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PLASMA; RELICT RADIATION; THERMODYNAMICS; UNIVERSE; X RADIATION