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Title: The first two years of electromagnetic follow-up with advanced LIGO and Virgo

We anticipate the first direct detections of gravitational waves (GWs) with Advanced LIGO and Virgo later this decade. Though this groundbreaking technical achievement will be its own reward, a still greater prize could be observations of compact binary mergers in both gravitational and electromagnetic channels simultaneously. During Advanced LIGO and Virgo's first two years of operation, 2015 through 2016, we expect the global GW detector array to improve in sensitivity and livetime and expand from two to three detectors. We model the detection rate and the sky localization accuracy for binary neutron star (BNS) mergers across this transition. We have analyzed a large, astrophysically motivated source population using real-time detection and sky localization codes and higher-latency parameter estimation codes that have been expressly built for operation in the Advanced LIGO/Virgo era. We show that for most BNS events, the rapid sky localization, available about a minute after a detection, is as accurate as the full parameter estimation. We demonstrate that Advanced Virgo will play an important role in sky localization, even though it is anticipated to come online with only one-third as much sensitivity as the Advanced LIGO detectors. We find that the median 90% confidence region shrinks from ∼500more » deg{sup 2} in 2015 to ∼200 deg{sup 2} in 2016. A few distinct scenarios for the first LIGO/Virgo detections emerge from our simulations.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ; ; ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ; ; ; ; ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8]
  1. LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)
  3. Leonard E. Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology, and Astrophysics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)
  4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 185 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)
  5. School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)
  6. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)
  7. Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)
  8. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22370258
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 795; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; ASTROPHYSICS; BINARY STARS; DETECTION; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; NEUTRON STARS; OPERATION; SENSITIVITY; SIMULATION