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Title: Are dusty galaxies blue? Insights on UV attenuation from dust-selected galaxies

Galaxies' rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) properties are often used to directly infer the degree to which dust obscuration affects the measurement of star formation rates (SFRs). While much recent work has focused on calibrating dust attenuation in galaxies selected at rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, locally and at high-z, here we investigate attenuation in dusty, star forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected at far-infrared wavelengths. By combining multiwavelength coverage across 0.15-500 μm in the COSMOS field, in particular making use of Herschel imaging, and a rich data set on local galaxies, we find an empirical variation in the relationship between the rest-frame UV slope (β) and the ratio of infrared-to-ultraviolet emission (L {sub IR}/L {sub UV} ≡ IRX) as a function of infrared luminosity, or total SFR. Both locally and at high-z, galaxies above SFR ≳ 50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} deviate from the nominal IRX-β relation toward bluer colors by a factor proportional to their increasing IR luminosity. We also estimate contamination rates of DSFGs on high-z dropout searches of <<1% at z ≲ 4-10, providing independent verification that contamination from very dusty foreground galaxies is low in Lyman-break galaxy searches. Overall, our results are consistent with the physical interpretation that DSFGs, e.g.,more » galaxies with >50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, are dominated at all epochs by short-lived, extreme burst events, producing many young O and B stars that are primarily, yet not entirely, enshrouded in thick dust cocoons. The blue rest-frame UV slopes of DSFGs are inconsistent with the suggestion that most DSFGs at z ∼ 2 exhibit steady-state star formation in secular disks.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)
  2. California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  3. Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)
  4. Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)
  5. Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  6. Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)
  7. Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy)
  8. Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)
  10. CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, bât. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)
  11. Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)
  12. Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)
  13. Nagoya University, Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22370162
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 796; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ATTENUATION; COLOR; DUSTS; EMISSION; LUMINOSITY; MILKY WAY; RED SHIFT; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; STEADY-STATE CONDITIONS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; UNIVERSE; VERIFICATION; WAVELENGTHS