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Title: The solar energetic particle event on 2013 April 11: an investigation of its solar origin and longitudinal spread

We investigate the solar phenomena associated with the origin of the solar energetic particle (SEP) event observed on 2013 April 11 by a number of spacecraft distributed in the inner heliosphere over a broad range of heliolongitudes. We use extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white-light coronagraph observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) to determine the angular extent of the EUV wave and coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with the origin of the SEP event. We compare the estimated release time of SEPs observed at each spacecraft with the arrival time of the structures associated with the CME at the footpoints of the field lines connecting each spacecraft with the Sun. Whereas the arrival of the EUV wave and CME-driven shock at the footpoint of STEREO-B is consistent, within uncertainties, with the release time of the particles observed by this spacecraft, the EUV wave never reached the footpoint of the field lines connecting near-Earth observers with the Sun, even though an intense SEP event was observed there. We show that the west flank of the CME-driven shock propagating at high altitudes above the solar surfacemore » was most likely the source of the particles observed near Earth, but it did not leave any EUV trace on the solar disk. We conclude that the angular extent of the EUV wave on the solar surface did not agree with the longitudinal extent of the SEP event in the heliosphere. Hence EUV waves cannot be used reliably as a proxy for the solar phenomenon that accelerates and injects energetic particles over broad ranges of longitudes.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5]
  1. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)
  2. School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)
  3. Space Research Group, Physics and Mathematics Department, University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, E-28871 Spain (Spain)
  4. Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel D-24118 (Germany)
  5. Predictive Science, 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22370103
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 797; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; EMISSION; EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; HELIOSPHERE; MASS; SOLAR WIND; SUN; SURFACES; VISIBLE RADIATION