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Title: Galaxy redshift surveys with sparse sampling

Survey observations of the three-dimensional locations of galaxies are a powerful approach to measure the distribution of matter in the universe, which can be used to learn about the nature of dark energy, physics of inflation, neutrino masses, etc. A competitive survey, however, requires a large volume (e.g., V{sub survey} ∼ 10Gpc{sup 3}) to be covered, and thus tends to be expensive. A ''sparse sampling'' method offers a more affordable solution to this problem: within a survey footprint covering a given survey volume, V{sub survey}, we observe only a fraction of the volume. The distribution of observed regions should be chosen such that their separation is smaller than the length scale corresponding to the wavenumber of interest. Then one can recover the power spectrum of galaxies with precision expected for a survey covering a volume of V{sub survey} (rather than the volume of the sum of observed regions) with the number density of galaxies given by the total number of observed galaxies divided by V{sub survey} (rather than the number density of galaxies within an observed region). We find that regularly-spaced sampling yields an unbiased power spectrum with no window function effect, and deviations from regularly-spaced sampling, which are unavoidablemore » in realistic surveys, introduce calculable window function effects and increase the uncertainties of the recovered power spectrum. On the other hand, we show that the two-point correlation function (pair counting) is not affected by sparse sampling. While we discuss the sparse sampling method within the context of the forthcoming Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment, the method is general and can be applied to other galaxy surveys.« less
Authors:
; ; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ; ; ;  [4] ;  [5] ; ;  [6] ; ; ; ;  [7] ; ;  [8]
  1. Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)
  3. Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)
  4. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)
  5. McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-1205 (United States)
  6. Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstraße, 85748 Garching (Germany)
  7. Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-1205 (United States)
  8. Texas Cosmology Center, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-1205 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22369848
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2013; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; CORRELATION FUNCTIONS; GALAXIES; NEUTRINOS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; RED SHIFT; SPACE; SPECTRA; TELESCOPES; UNIVERSE COSMOLOGICAL INFLATION