skip to main content

SciTech ConnectSciTech Connect

Title: THE CLUSTERING AND HALO MASSES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z < 1

We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star-forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we construct a sample of 22,553 24 μm sources selected from 8.42 deg{sup 2} of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Boötes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors that are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}) and is composed entirely of LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r {sub 0} ≈ 3-6 h {sup –1} Mpc for almost all of our star-forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L {sub TIR} at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L {sub TIR} (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at eachmore » redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M {sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.9} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star-forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star-forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L ≲ 2.5 L {sub *} blue galaxies in the local universe, but star-forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L {sub TIR} ≳ 10{sup 11.7} L {sub ☉}) at 0.6 < z < 1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.« less
Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1] ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ;  [5]
  1. School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)
  2. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)
  4. Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)
  5. National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364802
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 797; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CLOUDS; COLOR; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COSMIC DUST; COSMOLOGY; GALACTIC EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; MASS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; RED SHIFT; STAR CLUSTERS; STARS; UNIVERSE