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Title: ON THE INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT CENTRAL STELLAR MASS-HALO MASS RELATION, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF THE MOST MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z ∼ 1

The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain under debate. Several recent works support a relation in the local universe steeper than previously thought. Based on comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z ∼ 1 for stellar masses M {sub star} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of β ≳ 0.35-0.70 instead of the usual β ≲ 0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (≲ 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for M {sub star} > 3 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to themore » evolution of the most massive galaxies since z ∼ 1.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ; ; ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ; ;  [9] ; ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] more »; « less
  1. School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT 84112 (United States)
  3. Centre for Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7701 (South Africa)
  4. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-234, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
  5. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)
  6. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)
  7. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)
  8. Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)
  9. Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)
  10. GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Univ. Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)
  11. Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)
  12. Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)
  13. University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364787
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 797; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BARYONS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COSMOLOGICAL MODELS; COSMOLOGY; GALACTIC EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; LIMITING VALUES; MASS; OSCILLATIONS; RED SHIFT; UNIVERSE