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Title: THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRIES, DIFFERENT RADIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF LARGE AND SMALL DUST GRAINS IN PDS 70 {sup ,}

The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-μm size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and {sup 12}CO J = 2 → 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of ∼65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of ∼80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk inmore » small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ; ; ; ;  [7] ; ;  [8] ;  [9] ; ; ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] more »; « less
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)
  2. College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan)
  3. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  4. Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  5. Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan)
  6. Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)
  7. Subaru Telescope, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)
  8. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)
  9. Laboratoire Hippolyte Fizeau, UMR6525, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 28, avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France)
  10. Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)
  11. Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)
  12. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  13. Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364532
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 799; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASYMMETRY; BRIGHTNESS; FLUX DENSITY; GRAIN GROWTH; IMAGES; INTERFEROMETRY; MASS; ORIGIN; PLANETS; POLARIZATION; POTENTIALS; PROTOPLANETS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; STAR EVOLUTION; T TAURI STARS; VISIBLE RADIATION; VORTICES