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Title: Properties of submillimeter galaxies in the CANDELS-S goods-south field

We derive physical properties of 10 submillimeter galaxies located in the CANDELS coverage of the GOODS-S field. The galaxies were first identified as submillimeter sources with the LABOCA bolometer and subsequently targeted for 870 μm continuum observation with ALMA. The high angular resolution of the ALMA imaging allows secure counterparts to be identified in the CANDELS multiband data set. The CANDELS data provide deep photometric data from UV through near-infrared wavelengths. Using synthetic spectral energy distributions, we derive photometric redshifts, stellar masses, extinction, ages, and the star formation history. The redshift range is z = 1.65-4.76, with two of the galaxies located at z > 4. Two submillimeter galaxy (SMG) counterparts have stellar masses 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than the rest. The remaining SMG counterparts have stellar masses around 1 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The stellar population in the SMGs is typically older than the expected duration of the submillimeter phase, suggesting that the star formation history of SMGs is more complex than a single burst. Non-parametric morphology indices suggest that the SMG counterparts are among the most asymmetric systems compared with galaxies of the same stellar mass and redshift. The Hubble Space Telescope images show thatmore » three of the SMGs are associated with ongoing mergers. The remaining counterparts are isolated. Estimating the dust and molecular gas mass from the submillimeter fluxes, and comparing with our stellar masses shows that the gas mass fraction of SMGs is ∼28% and that the final stellar mass is likely to be ∼(1-2) × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ;  [2] ; ; ; ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ;  [5] ;  [6] ; ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] ;  [14] more »; « less
  1. European Southern Observatory/Joint ALMA Observatory, 3107 Alonso de Cordova, Santiago (Chile)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)
  3. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  4. National Optical Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)
  5. UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  6. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 95064 (United States)
  7. INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monteporzio (Italy)
  8. University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)
  10. Physics Department, CUNY New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)
  11. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  12. Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)
  13. Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)
  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MST 087, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22357098
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 785; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASYMMETRY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COSMOLOGY; DUSTS; ENERGY SPECTRA; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; MASS; PHOTOMETRY; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; RED SHIFT; RESOLUTION; SPACE; STARS; TELESCOPES