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Title: Changes to Saturn's zonal-mean tropospheric thermal structure after the 2010-2011 northern hemisphere storm

We use far-infrared (20-200 μm) data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on the Cassini spacecraft to determine the zonal-mean temperature and hydrogen para-fraction in Saturn's upper troposphere from observations taken before and after the large northern hemisphere storm in 2010-2011. During the storm, zonal mean temperatures in the latitude band between approximately 25°N and 45°N (planetographic latitude) increased by about 3 K, while the zonal mean hydrogen para-fraction decreased by about 0.04 over the same latitudes, at pressures greater than about 300 mbar. These changes occurred over the same latitude range as the disturbed cloud band seen in visible images. The observations are consistent with low para-fraction gas being brought up from the level of the water cloud by the strong convective plume associated with the storm, while being heated by condensation of water vapor, and then advected zonally by the winds near the plume tops in the upper troposphere.
Authors:
;  [1] ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ;  [4]
  1. Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)
  3. Atmospheric Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarenden Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)
  4. Planetary Systems Laboratory NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22356972
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 786; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; APPROXIMATIONS; ASTROPHYSICS; FAR INFRARED RADIATION; HYDROGEN; IMAGES; INFRARED SPECTROMETERS; NORTHERN HEMISPHERE; PLUMES; SATELLITE ATMOSPHERES; SATELLITES; SATURN PLANET; STORMS; TROPOSPHERE; WATER