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Title: The panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. V. Ages and masses of the year 1 stellar clusters

We present ages and masses for 601 star clusters in M31 from the analysis of the six filter integrated light measurements from near-ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, made as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). We derive the ages and masses using a probabilistic technique, which accounts for the effects of stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function. Tests on synthetic data show that this method, in conjunction with the exquisite sensitivity of the PHAT observations and their broad wavelength baseline, provides robust age and mass recovery for clusters ranging from ∼10{sup 2} to 2 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. We find that the cluster age distribution is consistent with being uniform over the past 100 Myr, which suggests a weak effect of cluster disruption within M31. The age distribution of older (>100 Myr) clusters falls toward old ages, consistent with a power-law decline of index –1, likely from a combination of fading and disruption of the clusters. We find that the mass distribution of the whole sample can be well described by a single power law with a spectral index of –1.9 ± 0.1 over the range of 10{sup 3}-3 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}.more » However, if we subdivide the sample by galactocentric radius, we find that the age distributions remain unchanged. However, the mass spectral index varies significantly, showing best-fit values between –2.2 and –1.8, with the shallower slope in the highest star formation intensity regions. We explore the robustness of our study to potential systematics and conclude that the cluster mass function may vary with respect to environment.« less
Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11]
  1. Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  4. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  5. Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)
  6. University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  7. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  8. Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands)
  9. Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)
  10. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)
  11. Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22356927
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 786; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DATA ANALYSIS; FILTERS; GALAXIES; MASS; MASS DISTRIBUTION; PROBABILISTIC ESTIMATION; SENSITIVITY; STAR CLUSTERS; STARS; STOCHASTIC PROCESSES; TRITIUM RECOVERY; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION