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Title: Bulge growth and quenching since z = 2.5 in CANDELS/3D-HST

Exploiting the deep high-resolution imaging of all five CANDELS fields, and accurate redshift information provided by 3D-HST, we investigate the relation between structure and stellar populations for a mass-selected sample of 6764 galaxies above 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, spanning the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2.5. For the first time, we fit two-dimensional models comprising a single Sérsic fit and two-component (i.e., bulge + disk) decompositions not only to the H-band light distributions, but also to the stellar mass maps reconstructed from resolved stellar population modeling. We confirm that the increased bulge prominence among quiescent galaxies, as reported previously based on rest-optical observations, remains in place when considering the distributions of stellar mass. Moreover, we observe an increase of the typical Sérsic index and bulge-to-total ratio (with median B/T reaching 40%-50%) among star-forming galaxies above 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Given that quenching for these most massive systems is likely to be imminent, our findings suggest that significant bulge growth precedes a departure from the star-forming main sequence. We demonstrate that the bulge mass (and ideally knowledge of the bulge and total mass) is a more reliable predictor of the star-forming versus quiescent state of a galaxy thanmore » the total stellar mass. The same trends are predicted by the state-of-the-art, semi-analytic model by Somerville et al. In this model, bulges and black holes grow hand in hand through merging and/or disk instabilities, and feedback from active galactic nuclei shuts off star formation. Further observations will be required to pin down star formation quenching mechanisms, but our results imply that they must be internal to the galaxies and closely associated with bulge growth.« less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ; ;  [6] ; ; ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] more »; « less
  1. Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)
  3. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  4. European Southern Observatory, Alonson de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)
  5. Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)
  6. UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  7. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  8. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colby College, Waterville, ME 0490 (United States)
  10. Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)
  11. Department of Physics, University of California at SantaCruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  12. South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory Road, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22356710
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 788; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; DECOMPOSITION; DISTRIBUTION; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; INSTABILITY; MAPS; MASS; QUENCHING; RED SHIFT; RESOLUTION; SIMULATION; STARS; VISIBLE RADIATION