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Title: Galaxy and mass assembly (GAMA): Mid-infrared properties and empirical relations from WISE

The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey furnishes a deep redshift catalog that, when combined with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), allows us to explore for the first time the mid-infrared properties of >110, 000 galaxies over 120 deg{sup 2} to z ≅ 0.5. In this paper we detail the procedure for producing the matched GAMA-WISE catalog for the G12 and G15 fields, in particular characterizing and measuring resolved sources; the complete catalogs for all three GAMA equatorial fields will be made available through the GAMA public releases. The wealth of multiwavelength photometry and optical spectroscopy allows us to explore empirical relations between optically determined stellar mass (derived from synthetic stellar population models) and 3.4 μm and 4.6 μm WISE measurements. Similarly dust-corrected Hα-derived star formation rates can be compared to 12 μm and 22 μm luminosities to quantify correlations that can be applied to large samples to z < 0.5. To illustrate the applications of these relations, we use the 12 μm star formation prescription to investigate the behavior of specific star formation within the GAMA-WISE sample and underscore the ability of WISE to detect star-forming systems at z ∼ 0.5. Within galaxy groups (determined by a sophisticatedmore » friends-of-friends scheme), results suggest that galaxies with a neighbor within 100 h {sup –1} kpc have, on average, lower specific star formation rates than typical GAMA galaxies with the same stellar mass.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ; ; ; ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] ;  [14] ;  [15] more »; « less
  1. Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)
  2. Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)
  3. International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)
  4. European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
  5. School of Physics, the University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)
  6. SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)
  7. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom)
  8. School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)
  9. Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)
  10. Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, PR1 2HE Preston (United Kingdom)
  11. Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)
  12. Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)
  13. The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)
  14. Sterrenwacht Leiden, University of Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)
  15. Institute for Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22351427
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 782; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CATALOGS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CORRELATIONS; DUSTS; GALAXIES; INFRARED SURVEYS; LUMINOSITY; MASS; PHOTOMETRY; RED SHIFT; SPECTROSCOPY; STARS