skip to main content

Title: The compactness of presupernova stellar cores

The success or failure of the neutrino-transport mechanism for producing a supernova in an evolved massive star is known to be sensitive not only to the mass of the iron core that collapses, but also to the density gradient in the silicon and oxygen shells surrounding that core. Here we study the systematics of a presupernova core's 'compactness' as a function of the mass of the star and the physics used in its calculation. Fine-meshed surveys of presupernova evolution are calculated for stars from 15 to 65 M {sub ☉}. The metallicity and the efficiency of semiconvection and overshoot mixing are both varied and bare carbon-oxygen cores are explored as well as full hydrogenic stars. Two different codes, KEPLER and MESA, are used for the study. A complex interplay of carbon and oxygen burning, especially in shells, can cause rapid variations in the compactness for stars of very nearly the same mass. On larger scales, the distribution of compactness with main sequence mass is found to be robustly non-monotonic, implying islands of 'explodabilty,' particularly around 8-20 M {sub ☉} and 25-30 M {sub ☉}. The carbon-oxygen (CO) core mass of a presupernova star is a better, (though still ambiguous) discriminantmore » of its core structure than the main sequence mass.« less
Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22351387
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 783; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ABUNDANCE; CARBON; CARBON MONOXIDE; CONVECTION; DENSITY; DISTRIBUTION; EFFICIENCY; FAILURES; IRON; ISLANDS; METALLICITY; MIXING; NEUTRINOS; NEUTRONS; NUCLEOSYNTHESIS; OXYGEN; SILICON; STAR EVOLUTION; SUPERNOVAE