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Title: NGC 1266 As a local candidate for rapid cessation of star formation

We present new Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae (SAURON) integral-field spectroscopy and Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) observations of molecular outflow host galaxy NGC 1266 that indicate NGC 1266 has experienced a rapid cessation of star formation. Both the SAURON maps of stellar population age and the Swift UVOT observations demonstrate the presence of young (<1 Gyr) stellar populations within the central 1 kpc, while existing Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy CO(1-0) maps indicate that the sites of current star formation are constrained to only the inner few hundred parsecs of the galaxy. The optical spectrum of NGC 1266 from Moustakas and Kennicutt reveal a characteristic poststarburst (K+A) stellar population, and Davis et al. confirm that ionized gas emission in the system originate from a shock. Galaxies with K+A spectra and shock-like ionized gas line ratios may comprise an important, overlooked segment of the poststarburst population, containing exactly those objects in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is actively expelling the star-forming material. While AGN activity is not the likely driver of the poststarburst event that occurred 500 Myr ago, the faint spiral structure seen in the Hubble Space Telescope Wide-field Camera 3 Y-, J-more » and H-band imaging seems to point to the possibility of gravitational torques being the culprit. If the molecular gas were driven into the center at the same time as the larger scale galaxy disk underwent quenching, the AGN might be able to sustain the presence of molecular gas for ≳ 1 Gyr by cyclically injecting turbulent energy into the dense molecular gas via a radio jet, inhibiting star formation.« less
Authors:
; ;  [1] ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ;  [5] ; ; ; ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] more »; « less
  1. Department of Astronomy, Hearst Field Annex, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  2. Physics Department, New Mexico Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)
  3. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  4. Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States)
  5. Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex (France)
  6. Sub-Department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)
  7. Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)
  8. European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Street 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)
  10. Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)
  11. Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia)
  12. Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)
  13. Observatoire de Paris, LERMA and CNRS, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22348216
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 780; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTRONOMY; CARBON MONOXIDE; EMISSION; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; NEBULAE; SPACE; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; STARS; TELESCOPES; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION