skip to main content

Title: Host galaxy spectra and consequences for supernova typing from the SDSS SN survey

We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of SN host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future analysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased toward lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors inmore » the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.« less
Authors:
; ; ;  [1] ; ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ; ; ; ;  [4] ;  [5] ; ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] more »; « less
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)
  3. African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 6 Melrose Road, Muizenberg, 7945 (South Africa)
  4. Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)
  5. Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB4 0HA (United Kingdom)
  6. Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)
  7. Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)
  8. Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)
  9. Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)
  10. Department of Astrophysics, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)
  11. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22340310
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (New York, N.Y. Online); Journal Volume: 147; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; BARYONS; CLASSIFICATION; COLOR; COSMOLOGY; GALAXIES; NOISE; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; OSCILLATIONS; PHOTOMETRY; RED SHIFT; SIGNALS; SKY; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; SUPERNOVAE; TELESCOPES; TRANSIENTS; VISIBLE RADIATION