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Title: TADPOL: A 1.3 mm SURVEY OF DUST POLARIZATION IN STAR-FORMING CORES AND REGIONS

We present λ 1.3 mm Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and eight star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ∼2.''5 resolution TADPOL maps with ∼20'' resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings. (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (∼20'') and small (∼2.''5) scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ∼1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in thesemore » sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ∼2.''5 resolution we see the so-called polarization hole effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article.« less
Authors:
; ; ;  [1] ;  [2] ; ; ;  [3] ; ; ;  [4] ; ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] more »; « less
  1. Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)
  2. SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands)
  3. Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  4. Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)
  5. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)
  6. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada)
  7. Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States)
  8. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Rd., Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada)
  10. Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)
  11. Physics Department, University of Johannesburg, C1-Lab 140, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)
  12. SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22340193
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series; Journal Volume: 213; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTRONOMY; COSMIC DUST; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAPS; MORPHOLOGY; ORIENTATION; POLARIZATION; PROTOSTARS; RANDOMNESS; RESOLUTION; STARS