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Title: The type IIb supernova 2013df and its cool supergiant progenitor

We have obtained early-time photometry and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) 2013df in NGC 4414. The SN is clearly of Type IIb, with notable similarities to SN 1993J. From its luminosity at secondary maximum light, it appears that less {sup 56}Ni (≲ 0.06 M {sub ☉}) was synthesized in the SN 2013df explosion than was the case for the SNe IIb 1993J, 2008ax, and 2011dh. Based on a comparison of the light curves, the SN 2013df progenitor must have been more extended in radius prior to explosion than the progenitor of SN 1993J. The total extinction for SN 2013df is estimated to be A{sub V} = 0.30 mag. The metallicity at the SN location is likely to be solar. We have conducted Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Target of Opportunity observations of the SN with the Wide Field Camera 3, and from a precise comparison of these new observations to archival HST observations of the host galaxy obtained 14 yr prior to explosion, we have identified the progenitor of SN 2013df to be a yellow supergiant, somewhat hotter than a red supergiant progenitor for a normal Type II-Plateau SN. From its observed spectral energy distribution, assuming that the light is dominated bymore » one star, the progenitor had effective temperature T {sub eff} = 4250 ± 100 K and a bolometric luminosity L {sub bol} = 10{sup 4.94±0.06} L {sub ☉}. This leads to an effective radius R {sub eff} = 545 ± 65 R {sub ☉}. The star likely had an initial mass in the range of 13-17 M {sub ☉}; however, if it was a member of an interacting binary system, detailed modeling of the system is required to estimate this mass more accurately. The progenitor star of SN 2013df appears to have been relatively similar to the progenitor of SN 1993J.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ; ; ; ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ; ;  [8]
  1. Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)
  3. Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
  4. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  5. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
  6. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85720 (United States)
  7. Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, México DF 04510 (Mexico)
  8. Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22340020
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (New York, N.Y. Online); Journal Volume: 147; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BOLOMETERS; CAMERAS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DIAGRAMS; ENERGY SPECTRA; EXPLOSIONS; GALAXIES; LUMINOSITY; MASS; METALLICITY; NICKEL 56; PHOTOMETRY; SIMULATION; SPECTROSCOPY; STAR EVOLUTION; SUPERNOVAE; TELESCOPES; VISIBLE RADIATION