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Title: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma mortality (1950–1999) and incidence (1969–1999) in the Eldorado uranium workers cohort

Uranium workers are chronically exposed to low levels of radon decay products (RDP) and gamma (γ) radiation. Risks of leukemia from acute and high doses of γ-radiation are well-characterized, but risks from lower doses and dose-rates and from RDP exposures are controversial. Few studies have evaluated risks of other hematologic cancers in uranium workers. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiation-related risks of hematologic cancers in the cohort of Eldorado uranium miners and processors first employed in 1932–1980 in relation to cumulative RDP exposures and γ-ray doses. The average cumulative RDP exposure was 100.2 working level months and the average cumulative whole-body γ-radiation dose was 52.2 millisievert. We identified 101 deaths and 160 cases of hematologic cancers in the cohort. Overall, male workers had lower mortality and cancer incidence rates for all outcomes compared with the general Canadian male population, a likely healthy worker effect. No statistically significant association between RDP exposure or γ-ray doses, or a combination of both, and mortality or incidence of any hematologic cancer was found. We observed consistent but non-statistically significant increases in risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) incidence and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) mortality with increasing γ-ray doses.more » These findings are consistent with recent studies of increased risks of CLL and NHL incidence after γ-radiation exposure. Further research is necessary to understand risks of other hematologic cancers from low-dose exposures to γ-radiation. - Highlights: • We analyzed long-term follow-up for hematologic cancers of the Eldorado uranium workers. • Workers were exposed to a unique combination of radon decay products (RDP) and gamma (γ) ray doses. • Exposures to RDP and γ-ray doses were not associated with significantly increased risks of cancers. • Radiation risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Hodgkin lymphoma were increased. • Study findings provide additional support for radiation-related risks of CLL.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [2]
  1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94118 (United States)
  2. Radiation and Health Sciences Division, Directorate of Environmental and Radiation Protection and Assessment, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1P 5S9 (Canada)
  3. Frost and Frost Consultants, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7H 0A1 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22337279
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Research; Journal Volume: 130; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DAUGHTER PRODUCTS; DEATH; DOSE RATES; GAMMA RADIATION; HEALTH HAZARDS; LEUKEMIA; LYMPHOMAS; MORTALITY; PERSONNEL; RADIATION DOSES; RADON; URANIUM