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Title: A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid–particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid–particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge–Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. Itmore » is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and −0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered. This finding may lead to more comprehensive studies of the effect of the particle rotation on fluid–solid drag laws. It is also demonstrated that, when the third-order or the fourth-order Runge–Kutta scheme is used, the numerical stability of the present IB-LBM is better than that of all methods in the literature, including the previous IB-LBMs and also the methods with the combination of the IBM and the traditional incompressible Navier–Stokes solver. - Highlights: • The IBM is embedded in the LBM using Runge–Kutta time schemes. • The effectiveness of the present IB-LBM is validated by benchmark applications. • For the first time, the IB-LBM achieves the second-order accuracy. • The numerical stability of the present IB-LBM is better than previous methods.« less
Authors:
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Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22314874
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Computational Physics; Journal Volume: 268; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BENCHMARKS; CONVERGENCE; EXTRAPOLATION; FLUIDS; MOMENT OF INERTIA; NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS; PARTICLES; ROTATION; RUNGE-KUTTA METHOD; SPHERES; TWO-PHASE FLOW; VELOCITY; VISCOUS FLOW