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Title: Optimization of micro-aeration intensity in acidogenic reactor of a two-phase anaerobic digester treating food waste

Highlights: • Effect of micro-aeration on acidogenesis and hydrolysis of food waste was investigated. • Micro-aeration at 258 L-air/kg TS/d increased the VFAs production 3-fold. • High aeration leads to loss of substrate through microbial biomass and respiration. • Optimum aeration increased methane recovery while high aeration intensity reduced methane yield. - Abstract: Micro-aeration is known to promote the activities of hydrolytic exo-enzymes and used as a strategy to improve the hydrolysis of particulate substrate. The effect of different micro-aeration rates, 0, 129, 258, and 387 L-air/kg TS/d (denoted as LBR-AN, LBR-6h, LBR-3h and LBR-2h, respectively) on the solubilization of food waste was evaluated at 35 °C in four leach bed reactors (LBR) coupled with methanogenic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Results indicate that the intensity of micro-aeration influenced the hydrolysis and methane yield. Adequate micro-aeration intensity in LBR-3h and LBR-2h significantly enhanced the carbohydrate and protein hydrolysis by 21–27% and 38–64% respectively. Due to the accelerated acidogenesis, more than 3-fold of acetic acid and butyric acid were produced in LBR-3h as compared to the anaerobic treatment LBR-AN resulting in the maximum methane yield of 0.27 L CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added} in the UASB. The performance of LBR-6h withmore » inadequate aeration was similar to that of LBR-AN with a comparable hydrolysis degree. Nevertheless, higher aeration intensity in LBR-2h was also unfavorable for methane yield due to significant biomass generation and CO{sub 2} respiration of up to 18.5% and 32.8% of the total soluble hydrolysate, respectively. To conclude, appropriate micro-aeration rate can promote the hydrolysis of solid organic waste and methane yield without undesirable carbon loss and an aeration intensity of 258 L-air/kg TS/d is recommended for acidogenic LBR treating food waste.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [3]
  1. Department of Environmental and Low-Carbon Science, School of Environment and Architecture, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)
  2. (Hong Kong)
  3. Sino-Forest Applied Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environment, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22304614
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Waste Management; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; ACETIC ACID; AERATION; BIOMASS; BUTYRIC ACID; CARBOHYDRATES; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; ENZYMES; FOOD; HYDROLYSIS; LEACHING; MATERIALS RECOVERY; METHANE; OPTIMIZATION; ORGANIC WASTES; SOLIDS