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Title: Spectral light separator based on deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film

We propose to funnel, select, and collect light spectrally by exploiting the unique properties of deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film. In our approach, each aperture has an electromagnetic cross section that is much larger than its physical size while the frequency of the collected light is controlled by its height through the Fabry-Pérot resonance mechanism. The electromagnetic crosstalk between apertures remains low despite physical separations in the deep-subwavelength range. The resulting device enables an extremely efficient, subwavelength way to decompose light into its spectral components without the loss of photons and spatial coregistration errors. As a specific example, we show a subwavelength-size structure with three deep-subwavelength slits in a metallic film designed to operate in the mid-wave infrared range between 3 and 5.5 μm.
Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. E. L. Ginzton Laboratory and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22303929
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; APERTURES; CROSS SECTIONS; EQUIPMENT; ERRORS; FILMS; LOSSES; METALS; PHOTONS; RESONANCE; VISIBLE RADIATION