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Title: A simple and clean source of low-energy atomic carbon

A carbon source emitting low-energy carbon atoms from a thin-walled, sealed tantalum tube via thermal evaporation has been constructed. The tube is made from a 0.05 mm thick tantalum foil and filled with {sup 12}C or {sup 13}C carbon powder. After being sealed, it is heated by direct electric current. The solvated carbon atoms diffuse to the outer surface of the tube and, when the temperature rises over 2200 K, the evaporation of atomic carbon from the surface of the tantalum tube is observed. As the evaporated species have low energy they are well-suited for the incorporation into liquid helium droplets by the pick-up technique. Mass analysis of the incorporated species reveals the dominant presence of atomic carbon and very low abundances of C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} molecules (<1%). This is in striking contrast to the thermal evaporation of pure carbon, where C{sub 3} molecules are found to be the dominant species in the gas phase. Due to the thermal evaporation and the absence of high-energy application required for the dissociation of C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} molecules, the present source provides carbon atoms with rather low energy.
Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22303536
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMS; CARBON; CARBON 12; CARBON 13; CARBON SOURCES; DISSOCIATION; DROPLETS; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; EVAPORATION; FOILS; HELIUM; LIQUIDS; MASS; MOLECULES; POWDERS; SURFACES; TANTALUM