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Title: Ionic conductivity and the formation of cubic CaH{sub 2} in the LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} composite

LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} composites were prepared by ball milling. Their crystal structures and phase composition were investigated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement, and their ionic conductivity was measured using impedance spectroscopy. The materials were found to form a physical mixture. The composites were composed of α-Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}, γ-Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} and orthorhombic LiBH{sub 4}, and the relative phase quantities of the Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} polymorphs varied significantly with LiBH{sub 4} content. The formation of small amounts of orthorhombic CaH{sub 2} and cubic CaH{sub 2} in a CaF{sub 2}-like structure was observed upon heat treatment. Concurrent formation of elemental boron may also occur. The ionic conductivity of the composites was measured using impedance spectroscopy, and was found to be lower than that of ball milled LiBH{sub 4}. Electronic band structure calculations indicate that cubic CaH{sub 2} with hydrogen defects is electronically conducting. Its formation along with the possible precipitation of boron therefore has an effect on the measured conductivity of the LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} composites and may increase the risk of an internal short-circuit in the cells. -- Graphical abstract: An Arrhenius plot of the ionic conductivity of the LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} composites (red, blue,more » green). The ionic conductivity of ball milled (gray) and non-milled (black) LiBH{sub 4} is shown for comparison. The filled symbols are measured during heating runs and the empty symbols are measured during subsequent cooling runs. The conductivity of the composites is in all cases higher during cooling, most probably due to the formation of an electronically conducting layer containing defect-rich cubic CaH{sub 2}. Such layer formation could eventually lead to a short circuit in the cell and reveals a general issue of chemical stability that should be attended to in the development of solid electrolyte materials. Highlights: • The LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} composite forms a physical mixture rather than a solid solution. • The formation of defect-rich, cubic CaH{sub 2} in a CaF{sub 2}-like structure is observed. • A new layer containing cubic CaH{sub 2} is conducting and may lead to a short-circuit.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ; ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)
  2. (Denmark)
  3. Physics Department, Institute for Energy Technology, Instituttveien 18, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22275850
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 211; Journal Issue: Complete; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; BORON; CALCIUM; CALCIUM FLUORIDES; CALCIUM HYDRIDES; COOLING; HEAT TREATMENTS; HEATING; IONIC CONDUCTIVITY; LITHIUM; ORTHORHOMBIC LATTICES; SOLID ELECTROLYTES; SOLID SOLUTIONS; SPECTROSCOPY; STABILITY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION