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Title: Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials

The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [2]
  1. School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22275713
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ACOUSTICS; AIRFOILS; ATTENUATION; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; CRYSTALS; DESIGN; FLUIDS; FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTIONS; PERIODICITY