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Title: Structural and electronic characterization of 355 nm laser-crystallized silicon: Interplay of film thickness and laser fluence

We present a detailed study of the laser crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films as a function of laser fluence and film thickness. Silicon films grown through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were subjected to a Q-switched, diode-pumped solid-state laser operating at 355 nm. The crystallinity, morphology, and optical and electronic properties of the films are characterized through transmission and reflectance spectroscopy, resistivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and optical and scanning-electron microscopy. Our results reveal a unique surface morphology that strongly couples to the electronic characteristics of the films, with a minimum laser fluence at which the film properties are optimized. A simple scaling model is used to relate film morphology to conductivity in the laser-processed films.
Authors:
;  [1] ; ; ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58102 (United States)
  2. Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58102 (United States)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22273535
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; AMORPHOUS STATE; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; CRYSTALLIZATION; DIODE-PUMPED SOLID STATE LASERS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; LASER RADIATION; MORPHOLOGY; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SILICON; SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE; SURFACES; THIN FILMS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION