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Title: ESTABLISHING A STEREOSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE KINEMATIC PROPERTIES OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS BASED ON A GENERALIZED SELF-SIMILARLY EXPANDING CIRCULAR GEOMETRY

The twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has enabled simultaneous white-light imaging of the solar corona and inner heliosphere from multiple vantage points. This has led to the development of numerous stereoscopic techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure and kinematics of solar wind transients such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Two such methods—triangulation and the tangent to a sphere—can be used to determine time profiles of the propagation direction and radial distance (and thereby radial speed) of a solar wind transient as it travels through the inner heliosphere, based on its time-elongation profile viewed by two observers. These techniques are founded on the assumption that the transient can be characterized as a point source (fixed φ, FP, approximation) or a circle attached to Sun-center (harmonic mean, HM, approximation), respectively. These geometries constitute extreme descriptions of solar wind transients, in terms of their cross-sectional extent. Here, we present the stereoscopic expressions necessary to derive propagation direction and radial distance/speed profiles of such transients based on the more generalized self-similar expansion (SSE) geometry, for which the FP and HM geometries form the limiting cases; our implementation of these equations is termed the stereoscopic SSE method. We apply the technique to two Earth-directed CMEs from differentmore » phases of the STEREO mission, the well-studied event of 2008 December and a more recent event from 2012 March. The latter CME was fast, with an initial speed exceeding 2000 km s{sup –1}, and highly geoeffective, in stark contrast to the slow and ineffectual 2008 December CME.« less
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)
  2. Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)
  3. Space Science Centre, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)
  4. Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  5. State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Centre, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)
  6. Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22270553
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 777; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; APPROXIMATIONS; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; HELIOSPHERE; MASS; SOLAR CORONA; SOLAR WIND; SUN; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; TRANSIENTS; VISIBLE RADIATION