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Title: Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ≤3 cm, negative margins, and ≤3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were allmore » skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute-University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)
  4. Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)
  5. Womens' Breast Center, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Connecticut (United States)
  6. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)
  7. Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)
  8. Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)
  9. Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)
  10. Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22267827
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION THERAPY; IRRADIATION; MAMMARY GLANDS; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; SKIN; SURGERY; TOXICITY