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Title: Challenges and opportunities for multi-functional oxide thin films for voltage tunable radio frequency/microwave components

There has been significant progress on the fundamental science and technological applications of complex oxides and multiferroics. Among complex oxide thin films, barium strontium titanate (BST) has become the material of choice for room-temperature-based voltage-tunable dielectric thin films, due to its large dielectric tunability and low microwave loss at room temperature. BST thin film varactor technology based reconfigurable radio frequency (RF)/microwave components have been demonstrated with the potential to lower the size, weight, and power needs of a future generation of communication and radar systems. Low-power multiferroic devices have also been recently demonstrated. Strong magneto-electric coupling has also been demonstrated in different multiferroic heterostructures, which show giant voltage control of the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of more than two octaves. This manuscript reviews recent advances in the processing, and application development for the complex oxides and multiferroics, with the focus on voltage tunable RF/microwave components. The over-arching goal of this review is to provide a synopsis of the current state-of the-art of complex oxide and multiferroic thin film materials and devices, identify technical issues and technical challenges that need to be overcome for successful insertion of the technology for both military and commercial applications, and provide mitigation strategies to address thesemore » technical challenges.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ; ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States)
  2. U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)
  3. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)
  4. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)
  5. Structured Materials Industries, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)
  6. Boston Applied Technologies, Inc., Woburn, Massachusetts 01801 (United States)
  7. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States)
  8. Institute of Materials Science and Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)
  9. Mechanics, Materials and Computing, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)
  10. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)
  11. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)
  12. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22258777
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BARIUM; COUPLING; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; FERROMAGNETIC RESONANCE; MICROWAVE RADIATION; OXIDES; RADAR; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; REVIEWS; STRONTIUM; THIN FILMS; TITANATES