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Title: A divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic paradigm for large spatiotemporal quantum molecular dynamics simulations

We introduce an extension of the divide-and-conquer (DC) algorithmic paradigm called divide-conquer-recombine (DCR) to perform large quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations on massively parallel supercomputers, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). In DCR, the DC phase constructs globally informed, overlapping local-domain solutions, which in the recombine phase are synthesized into a global solution encompassing large spatiotemporal scales. For the DC phase, we design a lean divide-and-conquer (LDC) DFT algorithm, which significantly reduces the prefactor of the O(N) computational cost for N electrons by applying a density-adaptive boundary condition at the peripheries of the DC domains. Our globally scalable and locally efficient solver is based on a hybrid real-reciprocal space approach that combines: (1) a highly scalable real-space multigrid to represent the global charge density; and (2) a numerically efficient plane-wave basis for local electronic wave functions and charge density within each domain. Hybrid space-band decomposition is used to implement the LDC-DFT algorithm on parallel computers. A benchmark test on an IBM Blue Gene/Q computer exhibits an isogranular parallel efficiency of 0.984 on 786 432 cores for a 50.3 × 10{sup 6}-atom SiC system. As a test of production runs, LDC-DFT-based QMDmore » simulation involving 16 661 atoms is performed on the Blue Gene/Q to study on-demand production of hydrogen gas from water using LiAl alloy particles. As an example of the recombine phase, LDC-DFT electronic structures are used as a basis set to describe global photoexcitation dynamics with nonadiabatic QMD (NAQMD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods. The NAQMD simulations are based on the linear response time-dependent density functional theory to describe electronic excited states and a surface-hopping approach to describe transitions between the excited states. A series of techniques are employed for efficiently calculating the long-range exact exchange correction and excited-state forces. The NAQMD trajectories are analyzed to extract the rates of various excitonic processes, which are then used in KMC simulation to study the dynamics of the global exciton flow network. This has allowed the study of large-scale photoexcitation dynamics in 6400-atom amorphous molecular solid, reaching the experimental time scales.« less
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [2] ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)
  2. (Japan)
  3. (Thailand)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22253376
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 140; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ALLOYS; CHARGE DENSITY; DECOMPOSITION; DENSITY; DENSITY FUNCTIONAL METHOD; EFFICIENCY; EXCITED STATES; HYBRIDIZATION; INTERATOMIC FORCES; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; MONTE CARLO METHOD; SILICON CARBIDES; SIMULATION; SOLIDS; TIME DEPENDENCE; WAVE FUNCTIONS